NEMO, CDEMA & Seismic Research Centre collaborated to address issues relating to geological hazards in St. Vincent & the Grenadines

During the week- January 23 - 27, 2012, the National Emergency Management Organization (NEMO) in collaboration with the Caribbean Disaster Emergency Management Agency (CDEMA) and Seismic Research Centre, St. Augustine Campus, University of the West Indies, Trinidad and Tobago has put in place several processes which will enhance NEMO’s capacity to effectively and efficiently address geological hazards issues relative to St. Vincent and the Grenadines.

The main results of the four-day collaboration are:

  1. A two day Geological Hazard Workshop on Monday 23rd and Tuesday 24th January, 2012 which exposed NEMO's staff and key stakeholders to information, knowledge and skills relative to geological hazards. This main objective of the workshop was to build the capacity at the national level to effectively and efficiently address issues relating to geological hazards and to enhance the capacity of the organisation to present, produce and disseminate geological hazard public information educational materials for St. Vincent and the Grenadines unique circumstances.
  2. To develop/present a draft upgraded Public Education Programme for geological hazards in St. Vincent and the Grenadines.
  3. Initiated discussions on generating and procuring upgraded public education materials on geological hazards, that are tailored for St. Vincent and the Grenadines.
  4. Customized existing public education materials on geological hazards, to reflect St. Vincent and the Grenadines unique circumstances so that the general public can have a better understanding of these hazards as it relates to the country.
  5. Develop a draft terms of reference and plan of action for the finalization of NEMO's Geological Hazards Public Education Programme.

The support for this collaboration was provided by CDEMA, through its Technical Assistance Secondment Protocol Programme to second professionals from the UWI Seismic Research Centre to address the short-comings at NEMO relative to geological hazards and to strengthen its Geological Hazards Public Education and Awareness Programme.

This collaboration was very timely, given the fact that, there is an active volcano on mainland St. Vincent, the proximity of the Grenadine Islands to the Submarine Volcano Kick Em Jenny, which makes them even more susceptible to tsunami, along with their close location to the sea (Bequia was severely affected by the 1885 tsunami). Also the increase in occurrence of earthquakes over the past four years and the fact that landslide is one of the most common hazard.
Dr. Richard Robertson and Mrs. Stacey Edwards from the Seismic Research Centre, St. Augustine Campus, University of the West Indies, Trinidad and Tobago led the week's activities.

Back To Top